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Simon Ripley biography

Simon Ripley is an artist, printmaker and a Director of Exeter’s Double Elephant Print Workshop.

In the past Simon worked as a legal advisor to asylum seekers and spent time with the UN High Commission for Refugees in Sudan and Hong Kong. It is perhaps this perspective that led Simon to initiate the community print workshop which strives to reach out to people of all ages and abilities through art in the form of printmaking. Last year Double Elephant won the South West Arts in Health Award for its Print on Prescription scheme supporting people with poor mental health to develop art projects. In recent years Simon has undertaken a range of hospital based residencies focused on an exploration of dementia. In 2010 he was Associate Artist at Derriford Hospital Plymouth where he developed a successful programme of art with elderly patients and this has led him on to work currently with people living with dementia in Franklyn Hospital, Exeter. In addition to delivering art workshops in the hospital, one of the aims of the project is for Simon to make his own art work in response to the experience. You can follow the process on the blog at www.simonripley.co.uk.

Simon exhibits nationally and internatiionally and his works are featured in collections held by The Bank of England, South Devon Healthcare Trust, Nottingham City Hospital, Deutsche Morgan Grenfell, Exeter University, Starbucks, Somerset County Council, Twickenham Rugby Football Union, The Victoria & Albert Museum, Direct Action Centre for Peace and Memory, Cape Town, South Africa and in private collections in the UK, USA and Japan.

Examples of Simon’s work will be hanging in the Exeter Northcott Theatre’s auditorium during TEDxExeter – abstract meditations which explore through colour a search for understanding the world around us.

News about Simon Ripley

Sparking connections at Franklyn Hospital

Exhibition_Poster_franklynAt TEDxExeter 2013, Carrie Clarke spoke about what we can still do for people with dementia, to strengthen their sense of belonging and their connection to place, people and each other. We learnt of the importance of design of the physical environmental of care centres, and she described the refurbishment and new garden being created at Franklyn Hospital in Exeter. She also told stories of how creating paintings together with artists had brought healing to people.

Artist Simon Ripley from Double Elephant Print facilitated a number of these sessions at  Franklyn. He created work both in advance of the sessions, to spark the people staying at the hospital at the time, and after in response to their work. Examples of Simon’s work were hanging in the Exeter Northcott Theatre’s auditorium during TEDxExeter 2013.

On 28 August, yours truly the TEDxExeter Storyteller was able to go to the opening of a thought-provoking exhibition in the Family Room at Franklyn, featuring work by former and current patients, and two of Simon’s prints. Numbers were small, but we – staff, relatives of former patients, Double Elephant – had some profound conversations. We were also able to see the garden, a beautifully-designed sensory space that looked absolutely stunning in the evening sunshine. Please see the photographs below.

At some point during the evening, Carrie told me briefly about how she was working with the Royal Albert Memorial Museum in Exeter, a collaboration that arose from a connection made at TEDxExeter 2013 with Camilla Hampshire, who spoke about RAMM: Home to a Million Thoughts. The following are Carrie’s words. For more information about the Fund she mentions in the last paragraph, please contact Carrie.

Collaboration with RAMM

With regards to collaboration with the museum: following TEDxExeter 2013, I made contact with Camilla to discuss the potential for any collaborative work. She put me in touch with Ruth Gidley, their Community Participation Officer. Ruth has been working hard on developing the museum into a more ‘dementia friendly’ venue, and as part of this has been collaborating with various local organisations such as Age UK and Innovations in Dementia. Through this contact, I was invited to speak at RAMM’s ‘Collaboration in Practice’ conference last November, which in itself brought about some more useful contacts.

In May Ruth and I attended a workshop in Bournemouth delivered by staff from the Museum of Modern Art in New York; they have been running a successful programme for several years now called ‘Meet me at MOMA’. This is a structured art discussion group for people with Alzheimer’s Disease or other dementias and their carers, each session looking at approx 6 paintings with a common theme. Ruth has set up a pilot project based on the MOMA approach, using their latest exhibition ‘Detached and Timeless’. I have today just got back from taking one of our service users to the session, which was excellent; it has given her a stimulating experience and provided her with something to talk about when her family visit. She commented that she would very much like to take her grandson to the exhibition, because of his interest in art. So for this particular woman, it was a great way of enabling her to feel more connected with the world around her, and will hopefully also be a point of connection with her grandson.

Ruth and I have also had some discussions about two other potential projects: 1. bringing quality photographs of the paintings form the exhibition to run a similar session at the hospital (thereby enabling more people to participate) and 2. Developing outreach sessions from the museum, using a collection of objects based around the theme of seasons. There’s an interesting link between handling objects which provide a range of sensory experiences, and how this can stimulate memories and possibly create new neural pathways. It’s what I touched on briefly in my TED talk: the sensory-emotional link. We are then considering creating some audio books made by the individual participants (Ruth has experiemented with this already), and also the potential for using stop-motion animation as a creative way of capturing some of the stories which arise from the sessions. I’ve been using stop-motion animation with our service users for a while now, and it’s an amazing therapeutic tool! I’ll be speaking about my work at the Bristol Encounters short film and animation festival next week. If this approach proves effective, we will look at applying for funding to run a larger scale project, commissioning professional animators to work with us with a possible big screening at the museum. But that’s a long way off yet!

As a result of the museum conference, I was approached by a photographer, Ruth Davey from Stroud. She has recently facilitated a photography workshop with a group of service users at Belvedere [unit at Franklyn] in our new ‘Beautiful View’ garden. The process itself was very beneficial in terms of enabling sensory experiences, providing a space where people could express themselves creatively, and stimulating some fascinating story telling. And the end results were amazing! They will form our next exhibition at the hospital, and I hope will also be shown more widely.

This workshop was funded through the Margaret Whitaker Therapeutic Art Fund. Margaret’s daughter Carol set up the Fund in her mother’s memory, because she was so grateful to see her mother re-engaging with her love of art during Simon’s sessions run at Franklyn, and Carol saw the joy it brought her in her last few months. So that’s a wonderful legacy, with which we hope to continue to provide stimulating therapeutic arts activities at Franklyn.