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Video and Live blogging

Tobit Emmens talk

Tobit Emmens portraitBefore we break for lunch, Tobit has a challenge for us. In 3 minutes, he will tell us how to be a revolutionary and change the world. But it’s easy for him – others have to take much longer.

Step 1. Listen – as we’ve already heard, to what people are saying and what they aren’t saying.

Step 2. Stand up – literally, now; feel the ground beneath your feet, and hold a confident body posture; it will change you and will change others too.

Step 3. Smile – one of the basic signs of humanity.

So go, go and smile, and go for lunch as well.

More Information

Devon Partnership NHS Trust : Mental Health and Learning Disability Services for Devon

Tobit’s website, and on Twitter

TR14ers performance

TR14ers BW…. enter the TR14ers with a high-energy dance and music mix created specially for this event. I’ve included just two of their photos here, but Benjamin J Borley photographed all of the dancers during the rehearsals yesterday afternoon.

There are nine of them with three questions:

  • What… do you dance for? To push myself to the limits and surpass them.
  • Why… is dance important to you? It gives me a purpose and a future.
  • How… does dance affect your life? It gives me confidence to find myself and conquer my fears.

More cheers and a standing ovation. Their stories have really captured the heart.

More Information

TR14ers on Youtube and Twitter.

Tom Crompton talk

Tom Crompton portraitTom has a mysterious prop with him, something in a bag.

Let’s say you want to solve problems, but you realise that you can’t do it alone, so you work for a charity. But you still see that there is a gap with what governments are doing, and that motivations need changing. So you might enlist the help of marketeers to motivate people to lobby their MPs or donate to charity… similar to motivating people to buy a holiday.

Marketing people will say make it easy, “frictionless giving” at the click of a mouse. Assume people don’t care, therefore appeal to their self-interest – use a celebrity, make it cool, tell them how they will save money.

But the “conscience industry” is counter-productive.

The prop is Ed the Head, stuck on a pole. And Tom has an anatomically-incorrect slide of a head filled with balloons, representing groups of values. The values are common to all people. Extrinsic values are concerns about things like wealth and public recognition. When Ed came out of his bag and saw he was in an important place in front of an audience, his extrinsic values balloon increased. At the same time, his intrinsic balloon shrank – care for others, relationships, the environment, creativity.

In a study, two groups of people were invited to memorise words associated with food (control group), intrinsic and extrinsic values. Later, they were invited to volunteer their time. On average, the control group volunteered about 40 minutes, the intrinsic values group about 70 minutes, and the extrinsic about 30 minutes.

Intrinsic Ed is more likely to vote for politicians who are in favour of socially and environmentally friendly policies, to lobby for policies, to put himself out for others.

Exercising values strengthens them. But Ed sees thousands of images every day which remind him of the importance of consumption, the celebrity lifestyle, that he is a consumer rather than a citizen. And the more these extrinsic values are reinforced, the less Ed will exercise the intrinsic values.

It is important to ask how the important intrinsic values can be promoted. What messages can we campaign on? For example, for human well-being, against advertising.

Whatever help marketeers can offer, there’s an important distinction between selling care for others and selling holidays. It’s critically important what values you appeal to – to argue care for the environment on the basis of saving money actually helps to reinforce extrinsic values, and in the longer term it is likely to be counter-productive… and cut off the branch humanity is sitting on.

More Information

The Common Cause website – valuesandframes.org

Encourage Tom to use Twitter more